Penguin’s Page Turners Giveaway

Jane Corry, I Made a Mistake

Have you always enjoyed getting stuck into a good book or has lockdown given you a new found love for reading? If so, then we have a great giveaway coming up!

We have teamed up with Penguin’s Page Turners to bring a fantastic giveaway of Jane Corry’s new book, I Made A Mistake and an Ava May Aromas Starter Pack as well as a £25 gift card

To enter, simply head over to the Page Turners Facebook Page and complete the following steps: 

  1. Follow @avamayaromas
  2. Follow@janecorryauthor
  3. Comment below telling them about a book you have loved in lockdown

The giveaway will launch on 4th June 2020 on Page Turners Facebook Page @thepageturners and the winner will be announced on Wednesday 8th June 2020 at 9am, open to those in the UK only.

Jane Corry

I Made A Mistake is a heart-in-mouth, darkly addictive psychological thriller about a woman who makes a mistake which ends up being deadly. It’s for fans of Nicci French, Lisa Jewell and Clare Mackintosh.

Jane Corry is a Sunday Times bestselling author and we couldn’t pass up the opportunity to get a few words from her about her journey and the new book…

There are times when many of us wonder what happened to our first love and how our lives might have been quite different…

This is what inspired me to write I Made A Mistake. Poppy never thought she was ‘the type’ of woman to have an affair. But then Matthew comes back into her life after twenty-three years.

But there’s also more to my novel. We lived with my grandmother until I was 12 and then we moved just round the corner. So I grew up observing, at close quarters, the relationship between my mother and her mother-in-law! This influenced my decision to have Betty’s mother-in-law live with Poppy, her husband and their two teenage children. I also wanted to turn the difficult mother-in-law stereotype onto its head and make the two women very fond of each other. Betty tells her life story in alternate chapters going back to the 1960s. Both women have their secrets. And each road leads to life or death.

 

  • How did you make the change from journalist to novel writer and what were the easy bits and the more challenging obstacles?

I became a journalist because I wanted to be a novelist. I thought one had to be much older to gain experience necessary to write a novel. I’m not so sure that’s true now because every stage of life has its own voice.  I initially worked as a staff writer for women’s magazines and then freelanced from home for The Daily Telegraph while bringing up my three children.  When the youngest started playgroup, I felt I had time to start that novel – but it then took me twelve years and twelve rejected novels before I got accepted! I think it was because I wrote them in a rush between school drop-offs and pick-ups, whilst writing as a journalist at the same time!

The easy bit for me was the writing, especially writing the twists. I’ve always loved leading readers up the path! The challenging part was finding the time and also attracting the attention of an agent, and then a publisher. It’s a highly competitive world.

 

  • What goes into the planning of a new book once you have decided on a new idea?

The idea comes first and then I ‘people’ it with characters who are different from each other. I like to write in multi-viewpoint with at least two characters telling their different stories. It’s not until you reach a certain part that you realise how the two are connected. I plot quite carefully and have several brainstorms with my editor. However, you have to allow breathing space for the characters to develop. This might well mean changing the plot as I go along. I also revise several times. I have more time to do that now, even though I’m a hands-on granny.

 

  • Walking your dog along the beach inspires you but if writer’s block creeps in, how do you deal with it?

I don’t get writers’ block. When life gets tough, I write even more. I’ve always been like that. When I was a teenager, I wrote reams of ‘angst’ poetry. Sadly, I threw it away in my early twenties because I thought it might upset people. It’s one of my regrets.  Now I’ve learned to have the courage of my convictions as a writer. Writing is my therapy!

 

An inspiring lady and a great competition – we wish you the best of luck!

 

Source: Images from Penguin Page Turners

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